Most available antidepressants are ineffective for the younger ones — Study

  • Most of the available antidepressants are ineffective for the younger ones
  • A study said that antidepressants do not work for children and teenagers
  • The study covered 34 clinical trials involving 5,260 participants

Antidepressants to cure depression?

A recent study found out that most of the available antidepressants are ineffective for children and teenagers with major depression. And worse, some of which may be unsafe.

In an Agence France-Presse article that was posted on GMA News, it was disclosed that only one drug, fluoxetine, was found to work better at relieving the symptoms of depression than a look-alike placebo with no active ingredients.

“The balance of risks and benefits of antidepressants for the treatment of major depression does not seem to offer a clear advantage in children and teenagers,” said co-author Peng Xie from The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University in China.

With this, the researchers has a recommendation to the youths who are taking antidepressants. According to them, those who are taking such medications must be monitored closely; particularly at the beginning of treatment.

“We can’t be completely confident about the accuracy of the information contained in published and unpublished trials,” said lead author Andrea Cipriani.

Meanwhile, the authors of the study — which covered 34 clinical trials involving 5,260 participants who are aged nine to 18 — also urged for more transparency and information sharing.

“Delay in implementing responsible data sharing policies has negative consequences for medical research and patient outcomes,” Cipriani noted.

Depression

Depression, as disclosed by the National Institute of Mental Health, is a common but serious mood disorder.

It affects how a person feels, thinks, and handles daily activities such as sleeping, eating, or working.

To be diagnosed with depression, the symptoms must be present for at least two weeks.

Moreover, major depressive disorder affects about three percent of children who are aged six to 12 years old and about six percent of teenagers aged 13 to 18 years.

 

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