Study says midlife fitness prevents chances of stroke in later life

  • US research says that middle-aged people who live a fitter life are less prone to suffer from stroke
  • The study highly recommends that individuals must have at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise weekly
  • Stroke ranks 5th as the leading cause of death in the US

Based on a new US research, people who live a healthier life during their middle age are less likely to suffer stroke in their later age.

An article published by GMA News Online mentioned that the study involved nearly 20,000 adults whose ages range from 45 to 50.

As stated in the findings which was  published in a journal of the American Heart Association, the individuals, whereby some 79 percent were men and 90 percent were white, have undergone physical tests to measure their heart and lung exercise. Subsequently, they were ranked  as having either a high, middle or low level of fitness.

Those with the highest fitness level had a 37 percent lower risk of suffering a stroke after the age of 65 compared to those in the lowest fitness category, the study denotes.

It has been said that stroke ranks fifth as the leading cause of death in the United States and is further noted as a major cause of long-term disability, as well.

As such, the American Heart Association highly recommends that individuals must have at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise per week.

Senior study author Jarett Berry, an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, said that the findings support the unique and independent role of exercise in the prevention of stroke.

Ambarish Pandey, another study author who is a cardiologist at UT Southwestern in Dallas, disclosed that low fitness is generally ignored as an actual risk factor in clinical practice but added that their research suggests that low fitness in midlife is an additional risk to target. Thus he stressed that a fitter lifestyle will help prevent stroke in later life.

Researchers used data from the Cooper Longitudinal Study which were gathered between 1999 and 2000 that measured exercise tolerance through the use of a treadmill.

 

 

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