Temp’L: The old, rusty ship which was transformed into a stunning pavilion

  • An old ship was transformed into a stunning pavilion by South Korea-based Shinslab Architecture
  • Shinslab Architecture chopped off a part of a ship, flipped it upside down, and turned it into a beautiful building
  • The masterpiece won this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program in Seoul

Many times when something seems to be no longer serving its purpose, it gets discarded. However, there are some things that just cannot be classified as being worthless. — like an old ship was that transformed into a stunning pavilion by South Korea-based Shinslab Architecture.

In an article written by Ruta Grasyte of Bored Panda, it was disclosed that South Korea-based Shinslab Architecture created the stunning pavilion and called it the “Temp’L”.

Shinslab Architecture chopped off a part of a ship, flipped it upside down, and turned it into a beautiful building. They left the exterior corroded and painted the interior white. They also added a balcony, a spiral staircase, and trees underneath the hull to create a restful space.

When entering the ship’s rusty interior, visitors can find trees, benches, and a spiral staircase leading to a balcony.

Temp’L, which has won this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program in Seoul, is located at the entrance of the courtyard at MMCA Seoul. Shinslab Architecture hopes visitors will reflect on recycling and how architects can consider the environment at Temp’L. They said they aim “not only to develop a new method of construction in architecture by recycling materials, but for those who will see to create emotion.”

From washing machine to street lamps

Images by Anastasia Mazur via Bored Panda
Images by Anastasia Mazur via Bored Paanda

Likewise, in Portugal, more than a hundred old washing machines were transformed into colorful street lamps and used in the Sao Pedro Festival.

“We made steampunk street decoration out of washing machine drums for the festival of Sao Pedro in the town of Camara de Lobos, Madeira island, Portugal,” Anastasia Mazur said.

It took them about six months to collect 133 washing machines.

Loading…