The world’s possible hottest day ever is recorded in Kuwait

  • Weather historians believe that Kuwait had recorded the hottest day in the world ever
  • Mitribah in Kuwait recorded a blistering 129.2 degrees Fahrenheit (54 degree Celsius) on Thursday
  • Aside from Mitribah in Kuwait, Basra, Iraq also recorded 129 degrees Fahrenheit (53.9 degree Celsius) on Friday

KUWAIT CITY – With a blistering record of 129.2 degrees Fahrenheit (54 degree Celsius) on Thursday, weather historians believed that Kuwait had recorded the hottest day in the world ever.

Aside from Mitribah in Kuwait, another country recorded an almost equally scorching temperature as Basra, Iraq records 129 degrees Fahrenheit (53.9 degree Celsius) on Friday.

Steven Fletcher mentioned in his article for Mail Online that if proved correct, the measurements would represent the two hottest temperatures ever recorded in the Eastern Hemisphere, and possibly, in the entire world.

The temperature readings were recorded by Weather Underground meteorologist Jeff Masters and weather historian Christopher Burt, who also broke the news.

Reports said Mitribah and Basra’s readings are likely the highest ever recorded outside of Death Valley, California.

As of record, Death Valley currently holds the world’s hottest temperature of 134.1 degrees (56.7 Celsius), which was set on July 10, 1913.

However, Weather Underground’s Burt does not believe that Death Valley’s record is a credible measurement.

“[T]he record has been scrutinized perhaps more than any other in the United States,” Burt said.

“I don’t have much more to add to the debate aside from my belief it is most likely not a valid reading when one looks at all the evidence,” he added.

An article by Jason Samenow for The Washington Post said that discarding the Death Valley’s record in 1913, the 129.2-degree reading from Mitribah. Kuwait last Thursday would tie the world’s highest known temperature.

However, it is not only Kuwait which has the 129.2 degrees temperature measurement as it was also observed in Death Valley on June 30, 2013, and in Tirat Tsvi, Israel, on June 22, 1942. Masters added that even three measurement are mentioned, the Israeli measurement remains controversial.

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