US to give $32 million monetary aid for PH law enforcement

  • The United States offered to grant $32 million of monetary aid to the Philippines for law enforcement activities
  • This was pledged during US State Secretary John Kerry’s visit to President Rodrigo Duterte
  • The two also talked about Duterte’s efforts to eliminate drugs and criminality, which are also a problem of the US government

Malacañang disclosed that the United States have pledged to provide up to $32 million of monetary assistance to the Philippines for its law enforcement activities.

“The US committed $32 million in training and service,” Presidential Spokesperson Ernesto Abella said in a press conference.

On Wednesday, July 27, US State Secretary John Kerry visited President Rodrigo Duterte in Malacañang where they discussed the aid Philippines’ power ally will grant. PhilStar, however, said in its story that it is not yet clear what law enforcement activities would the aid be used for.

Aside from the pledge, Duterte and Kerry also talked about the president’s efforts to eliminate drugs and criminality, a problem shared by the US government.

“They also discussed common concerns – terrorism, crime, drugs, religious fanaticism, and maritime security. They also mentioned a menu of solutions,” Abella said.

“There was no alarm mentioned there. President Duterte did mention the way he has been handling the war against crime, especially the narcotic plague,” he added, speaking of Kerry’s reaction to Duterte’s style of enforcement.

Since the president took his oath on June 30, there have been more than 300 cases of drug suspects that were slain reportedly by either police authorities or vigilantes trying to silence the small fries.

Kerry also paid a courtesy call to foreign affairs secretary Perfecto Yasay where he lauded the Philippines’ victory on its case against China over the contested West Philippine Sea (South China Sea), saying it is a “very responsible and measured way that the Philippine government has responded to the decision.”

Loading…