Watch: Social experiment tests people to see if they’d stop to help a lost elderly woman

  • New Zealand Police staged a new social experiment that tests people if they will be willing to stop and help a lost elderly woman
  • The social experiment featured an elderly woman dressed only in a nightgown and socks, clutching a stuffed toy
  • The experiment revealed that most of the people didn’t even turn to look at the woman and continued on their way

WELLINGTON, New Zealand – The public’s compassion is tested in New Zealand as a new social experiment exposed people if they will be willing to stop and help a lost elderly woman.

The social experiment was captured in a video produced by the New Zealand Police and features an elderly woman dressed only in a nightgown and socks, clutching a stuffed toy.

The woman acted to be disoriented and confused while she stands on a busy pathway.

Leith Huffadine mentioned in her article for Mail Online that the video shows many people just walk straight past the woman, most of them ignoring her as she stands on the footpath.

The social experiment revealed that most of the people didn’t even turn to look at the woman as they continue on their way.

Eventually, like a sign that humanity is never lost, a woman approaches the elderly lady and started asking her a question before putting her arm around her shoulders and taking her to get help.

At the end of the video, a text shows up on the screen, reading: “She cared enough. Would you?”

The video was the latest in a series of social experiments done by the NZ Police for recruitment purposes called: “Do you care enough to be a cop?”

The videos hope to let people see what are the characteristics required to be a police officer.

“Distressed people need someone who’s going to be calm and understanding to their needs, even under the most stressful conditions,” said Police Inspector Sue Douglas, from the police mental health team, adding that the video highlighted how many mental health-related incidents police attended.

“While police is not the lead agency on mental health, they are often the first responders to these situations,” she added as quoted in an article by Stuff.co.nz.

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