Great Britain lass bounces back, leaps 34-ft to realize dream for Olympic fame

  • Bryony Page, first ever Briton to bag a medal in the trampolining event of the Olympic Games
  • Page started out trampolining in her back garden in Cheshire as a child
  • She leaped 34 feet in trampolining at the ongoing Rio Olympics

A lass from Great Britain, who previously suffered severe loss of motor skills, has bounced back to make history for her country late Friday night for being the first ever Briton to bag a medal in the trampolining event of the Olympic Games.

Bryony Page leaped 34 feet in trampolining at the ongoing Rio Olympics. With her routine and near-perfect landing, Page scored 56.040; just missing out on the gold with .005 point difference.

“Getting on that stage and performing, the feeling that I got once I finished my routine… that’s what I’m here for, I’m here to smash it and I just did it. I was crying even before I got my result – it’s just amazing,” Page said about her win, as per a Telegraph story.

Only a few years ago, Page suffered a severe case of ‘the yips’; a loss of fine motor skills more commonly experienced by athletes, especially in  precision sports like golf and darts — which hampered her from pursuing high-level competitions.

So basically, she’s hoping “this will inspire people who are struggling with this”, as shared on Daily Mail.

Page’s 34ft-high leap would easily have allowed her to gaze down at the roof of an average 1930s semi-detached house, which would stand at around 25ft high. This means she has leaped far higher than her childhood home.

As a teenager growing up, Page, as per reports, started out practicing on a home trampoline  in her back garden in Cheshire.

Page’s powerful performance in the finals was fueled by that inspiration to achieve and the drive to prove something from the day when she had her favorite pastime activity as a career.

That defining moment of Page’s conclusion to a childhood dream was realized when she secured the silver medal in the trampolining event won by reigning Olympic champion Rosie MacLennan of Canada, who scored 56.045.

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