Lozada after graft conviction: ‘It’s hard to love the country’

  • Engr. Rodolfo Noel “Jun” Lozada expressed dismay over the court conviction that was meted on him
  • He said “it’s hard to love the country”
  • Lozada blew the lid off the alleged anomalies surrounding the $329-million national broadband network deal during the term of former President and now Pampanga Rep. Gloria Macapagal Arroyo

“It’s difficult for me. It’s hard to love the country. I can be bitter if I will say it’s better to steal from the country than to say no. It’s a continuing agony. Loving this country is a continuing agony.”

This was said by Engineer Rodolfo Noel “Jun” Lozada after the Sandiganbayan convicted him of graft for awarding leasehold rights to his brother and a company linked to him when he was still head of Philippine Forest Corp. (PFC), an article written by Xianne Arcangel on GMA News Online stated.

However, Lozano stressed he is still trying his best to remain steadfast in loving the country despite what happened.

Lozada, who blew the lid off the alleged anomalies surrounding the $329-million national broadband network deal during the term of former President and now Pampanga Rep. Gloria Macapagal Arroyo, was sentenced with six years up to 10 years and one day imprisonment for violating Section 3(e) of Republic Act 3019, or the Anti-Graft and Corrupt Practices Act.

As such, his co-accused for the charge, his brother Jose Orlando, was also found guilty of graft and slapped with the same sentence.

Meanwhile, Lozano was acquitted of his other graft charge; the violation of Section 3(h) of RA 3019.

The charges filed against him stemmed from his decision to grant 6.59-hectare leasehold right to his brother, Jose Orlando, on December 18, 2009.

Lozada was then the president and chief executive officer of PFC; a government-owned and -controlled corporation under the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR).

For his temporary freedom, the Sandiganbayan has ordered Lozano to post a P60,000 bail. Also, the court gave his camp 15 days to file a motion for reconsideration.

Believing that his conviction serves as an example of what might befall people who just want to expose anomalies in the government.

“I’m not a politician. I can’t appoint anybody. I can’t give favors. Maybe this is really the fate of an ordinary Filipino. I only want to work,” he was quoted saying as he added that the ones who exposed corruption in government were the ones who ended up convicted.

 

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